More Poetry!

Hello,

We decided to write some of our own poetry inspired by Naomi Shibab Nye, explaining some of our own culture. Please tell us your thoughts, as well as post some of your own poetry.

Julia: 

How to Dream

Three years old,
My parents try to inspire me.
“Dream Big,”
“It’s America, anything can happen.”
 
But it’s all the unfulfilled promises.
The roads paved with cement instead of gold,
Working hard and barely paying the bills.
 
The gut-wrenching disappoint
When you look to the world,
Wanting to change it,
 
But instead your knees quivering,
Your voice shakes,
Just to say hello.
As you feel
Just like that little kid again.

Margaret: Melting Pot

we are a beautiful mix
of colors,
voices
histories,
art, 
song.
 
a melting pot
uniting us
with one dream
freedom
equality
 
America

~Julia and Margaret

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Tender at the Bone: review

Hey readers,

What were your thoughts on Tender at the Bone? What type of review would you have given it? Here are our reviews.

Julia:                                                                                

I gave Tender at the Bone five stars because I truly enjoyed this book. From the second I started reading, I couldn’t put this book down.  Hearing about her life through food really inspired me. Her humor was great and her voice made the book instantly likeable. I really like this book!

Margaret:

Two five star reviews, I hope that gives you a push to read this book, if not I don’t know what will? It is a truly amazing book, that weaves together excellent storytelling, humor, heartache, and most importantly food. While her life has been nothing  like mine, I could still relate to her, because she has a very honest and real writing style.

We hope you enjoyed the book as much as we obviously did!

~Julia and Margaret

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Memories Through Food

Hey everyone,

Food is an important element of culture and element in you life. Is there a story that you would be able to tell like Ruth Reichl?

Julia: This might not necessarily be a story, but every time my mom makes her stuffing from scratch (family recipe) or stuffed mushrooms(another family recipe), it makes me think of Thanksgiving. Every year, my mom makes her homemade stuffing and has to fight my brother and I from eating it all before the dish is even done. The smell of it wafts through the house, torturing my family as we eagerly wait until Thanksgiving day when we can devour it. One Thanksgiving, my family went to see my relatives in Georgia for Thanksgiving. These relatives I had not seen for the longest time, and I was so sad to leave. On Thanksgiving, my mom couldn’t make her stuffing since my grandma was making her secret recipe. Instead of making stuffing, my mom made her stuffed mushrooms. This was the first time I had tried one, and I was blown away. Now whenever we have to bring an appetizer, I ask my mom for stuffed mushrooms and remember my time in Georgia.

Margaret:

When I lived in St. Louis, my family and I loved Maggie Moo’s, an ice cream shop that served classic flavors like chocolate, vanilla, strawberry, and mint. During the sweltering hot summer, when every family seemed to live at the pool, going off the diving board was becoming popular with my friends. I was only four at the time, and the diving board was small, but to me was also a little frightening. After watching my friends cannibal into the water time after time, I decided I could do it. I waiting anxiously in the line, the ladder becoming closer and closer, until my feet were standing on the blue board. Yet in that moment I wasn’t afraid, I was excited and I jumped into the cold water, smiling. As a treat my parents took me to Maggie Moo’s where I happily and messily ate vanilla ice cream to celebrate. Just last summer I went back to St. Louis with my family, and we stopped at Maggie Moo’s. I was transported back to my childhood, and all the joy I got out of trying something new.

What are your memories with food?

~Julia and Margaret

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Beginner Food Critics?

Hey followers,

We’ve cooked recipes from the book, and this is how they have turned out.

Julia: I made the aptak brownies. They are absolutely delicious. This might have been the first time I have made brownies from scratch, and they did not disappoint. Just make sure not to over cook them, because it is hard to distinguish when they are done. Here are some Pictures:

Margaret: This Friday my mom and I are going to be made Ruth Reichl’s coconut bread. Pictures will be up soon!

Tell us how some of your recipes have turned out or any other cooking advice.

~Julia and Margaret

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How Important is food?

Hey food-lovers

Food is an important thing in Ruth Reichl’s life. How do you think food helped Ruth Reichl stay grounded throughout the book?

Julia: In life, I think that there is always something that a person has to count on in life. There is always something that a person loves and would never give up. It’s that one thing that makes yourself you. For Reichl, food and cooking is definitely that thing. In her life, she could never truly count on anything with her wild mother and ever-changing life, but food was always there for her. Whenever she needed to be calmed down or just wanted to have some fun, she’d turn to food and cook. Reichl had food as a stress reliever, and this helped her make it through rough times or have fun in the moment.

Margaret: Ruth Reichl definitely did not grow up in your “normal” household. Her mother poisoned dinner guests, moved the family to France, and then left Reichl on her own, when she was still a teenager. With all of these crazy changes, Reichl needed something to hold to, and that was food. With food she was able to stay true to herself, and keep up with her rapidly changing world. It also gave her a creative outlet, and currently is her career (as a food critic).

How do you think food kept Ruth Reichl grounded? What in life keeps you grounded?


~Julia and Margaret

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19 Varieties of Gazelles:Poems of the Middle East

Hey readers,

Today we are starting the book 19 Varities of Gazelles: Poems of the Middle East. The author, Naomi Shibab Nai, heard many stories of the Middle East when she was a girl. When the prejudice of Arabs came around after 9/11, she felt compelled to share the stories of the Middle East with Americans since she, herself was an Arab-America, so dive into this book and read about the many characters of the Middle East as time goes by. There is Fowzi, the girl who always wins playing dominoes, children in velvet dresses, Sitti Kharda who never lost hope, and many more. Travel to the Middle East with us while reading these poems.

~Julia and Margaret

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Tender At The Bone

Hey readers,

Our next book we are reading is Tender At The Bone, an autobiograohy by Ruth Reichl. This book is about how food affected the famous food critic’s life. All throughout her life, Reichl has grown up eating her mother’s cooking with moldy bread and past-expiration-date bread. As Reichl grows up, she learns the importance of food and comes to enjoy cooking. Through humor and food, this book springs to life.

Come read with us and comment on our discussions!

~Julia and Margaret

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